PDL

Building Map

Latent Variable Models for Indirectly or Imprecisely Measured Networks

Time
Speaker
Wesley T Lee

In the social sciences, social networks are important structures which represent the relationships and interactions between actors in a population of study. The most common methods for measuring networks are to survey study participants about who their connections are and to collect interaction activity between pairs of actors. However, directly measuring the exact network of interest can be challenging.

Building
Room
C-301

Estimation and testing under shape constraints

Time
Speaker
Nilanjana Laha

Over the last few decades, shape constrained methods have increasingly gathered importance in statistical inference as  attractive alternatives to  traditional  nonparametric  methods which often require tuning parameters and restrictive smoothness assumptions. This talk focuses on application of shape-constraints like unimodality and log-concavity in comparing the outcome of two  HIV vaccine trials. To this end, we develop  shape-constrained tests of stochastic dominance, and shape-constrained plug-in estimator of  the Hellinger distance between two densities.

Building
Room
C-301

Realized genome sharing in random effects models for quantitative genetic traits

Time
Speaker
Bowen Wang

DNA copies inherited from the same ancestral copy by related individuals are said to be identical by descent (IBD). IBD gives rise to genetic similarities between related individuals. In quantitative genetics, two fundamental problems are heritability estimation and gene mapping for genetic traits. IBD plays a critical role in the study of both problems. When working with population-based samples where pedigree information is unavailable, it is essential to estimate IBD accurately from genetic marker data using pedigree-free methods.

Building
Room
C-14A

Inferring Network Structure From Partially Observed Graphs

Time
Speaker
Mengjie Pan

Collecting social network data is notoriously difficult, meaning that indirectly observed or missing observations are very common. In this talk, we address two of such scenarios: inference on network measures without network observations and inference of regression coefficients when actors in the network have latent block memberships.

Building
Room
C-301

High-dimensional independence testing with maxima of rank correlations

Time
Speaker
Hongjian Shi

Testing mutual independence for high-dimensional observations is a fundamental statistical challenge. Popular tests based on linear and simple rank correlations are known to be incapable of detecting non-linear, non-monotone relationships, calling for methods that can account for such dependences. To address this challenge, we propose a family of tests that are constructed using maxima of pairwise rank correlations that permit consistent assessment of pairwise independence.

Building
Room
C-301

Recursive Inversion Models for Partially Ranked Data

Time
Speaker
Annelise Mavis Wagner

Can we do exact and tractable inferences in Mallows-like models for incomplete data? I will show that the answer is yes for the most general form Mallows-type model and a large class of partial orders known as partial rankings (including special cases like top-t rankings). I will also demonstrate that despite partial rankings lacking a sufficient statistic, exact inference is possible with overhead that is at most polynomial in O(nN) and that, in practice, the overhead per data point is negligible.

Building
Room
C-301

Fitting Stochastic Epidemic Models to Multiple Data Types

Time
Speaker
Mingwei Tang

Traditional infectious disease epidemiology focuses on fitting deterministic and stochastic epidemics models to surveillance case count data. Recently, researchers began to make use of infectious disease agent genetic data to complement statistical analyses of case count data. Such genetic analyses rely on the field of phylodynamics --- a set of population genetics tools that aim at reconstructing demographic history of a population based on molecular sequences of individuals sampled from the population of interest.

Building
Room
C-301

Large-Scale B Cell Receptor Sequence Analysis Using Phylogenetics and Machine Learning

Time
Speaker
Amrit Dhar

The adaptive immune system synthesizes antibodies, the soluble form of B cell receptors (BCRs), to bind to and neutralize pathogens that enter our body. B cells are able to generate a diverse set of high affinity antibodies through the affinity maturation process. During maturation, ``naive'' BCR sequences first accumulate mutations according to a neutral evolutionary process called somatic hypermutation (SHM), which may modify the associated binding affinities, and then are subject to natural selection by clonal expansion, which promotes the higher affinity antibodies.

Building
Room
C-301

Gradient Group Lasso Identifies Sparse Functional Basis for Molecular Manifolds

Time
Speaker
Samson Jonathan Koelle

We present a method for analyzing low-energy paths between molecular conformations by combining techniques in both manifold learning, which identifies such paths, and functional regression, which can parameterize them by explanatory non-linear functions. Unsupervised manifold learning approaches are useful for understanding molecular dynamics simulations since they disregard small-scale information such as peripheral hydrogen vibrations that can nevertheless drastically affect the observed energy.

Building
Room
C-301

Fast nonconvex changepoint detection

Time
Speaker
Sean William Jewell

In recent years, new technologies in neuroscience have made it possible to measure the activities of large numbers of neurons in behaving animals. For each neuron, a fluorescence trace is measured; this can be seen as a first-order approximation of the neuron's activity over time. Determining the exact time at which a neuron spikes on the basis of its fluorescence trace is an important open problem in the field of computational neuroscience. Recently, a convex optimization problem involving an L1 penalty was proposed for this task.

Building
Room
C-301